Harry talks to Newsweek

“Is there any one of the royal family who wants to be king or queen? I don’t think so, but we will carry out our duties at the right time.”

No, that wasn’t Prince William talking. This is a quote from Prince Harry in an exclusive interview with Newsweek.  Harry granted the news magazine access to observe his daily life over part of the past year.

I don’t think Harry meant to sound apathetic, but there you have it.  This does not bode well in the wake of William and Kate moving to Kensington Palace only when their 96-year-old grandfather retired. Can you believe that? Prince Philip had to officially hang up his hat before the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge would stay permanently in London for more work. The term reluctant doesn’t even begin to cover it.

Then Harry continues: “It’s a tricky balancing act,” he says to Newsweek. “We don’t want to dilute the magic….The British public and the whole world need institutions like it.”

Now Harry’s making me wonder. After all of his great work with Invictus and wounded soldiers, Harry’s obviously no slouch for being fifth in line. So is he trying to tell us that he doesn’t want to be king, but might have to be and he will carry on because that’s what you do. The fact that his brother and his sister-in-law seem, at best, tense about their increasing duties, I can’t help but think there’s a lot in going on in private and these comments are popping out because of it.

Somebody better do something soon, because when Harry himself is talking reluctance, we’re looking at a harsh reality: if no royal is interested in that “top job”, then why should the rest of us be? If you really want to preserve that magic (thank you, Walter Bagehot), then don’t sound so dismayed. Call a royal family meeting and figure out who will step aside/step in and then get on with it. The public will thank you for making a damn decision already, instead of the constant off putting “at the right time” or we’re “keen” to eventually do things, etc.

If I sound unsympathetic, I am. For two reasons:

1.) Kate joined the monarchy after a ten-year courtship and was slowly eased into what it entails.  The Queen obviously allowed breathing room so Kate could find her footing and so William could live more quietly with his little family. However, given the ages of the Queen and Philip (not to mention Prince Charles),  Kate and William couldn’t possibly have expected their “quiet life” to last too long. If they fear or resent that, time to reconsider their options.

2.) Nowhere have I found references to King George VI going on public tirades on how his brother dropped him, unprepared, into kingship. Nor have we read about Elizabeth II complaining in interviews about her role as queen perhaps starting too early (age twenty-five, for the record) or how much of a burden it is on her children. They. Just. Got. On. With. It. That’s why the monarchy has been so successful so far, and the younger generation needs to realize that.

Let us look at a page from the excellent book The Monarchy: An Oral Biography of Elizabeth II.

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Funny, I didn’t see one thing about hesitation or complaining in the media. If William, Kate, or Harry are so damn uncomfortable taking the lead in upholding that royal magic and doing as the Queen has done, then stand aside for someone else in the family to do it sooner rather than later. Nothing kills the magic like a great big yawn from the public, and that’s not how you show respect for your grandmother or her institution.

God Save the Queen.

Is there such a thing as “Parliament Casual”?

After the General Election in the United Kingdom ended in a hung parliament, it made the public wonder what would happen in regard to the Opening of Parliament this year.  Not only was it delayed by two days, but the Queen eschewed the traditional pomp.

Ascot opened the same week, but after only one day in attendance, Prince Philip fell ill and had to pass on Parliament. It fell to Prince Charles to accompany the Queen. It was surreal – Charles next to the Queen on the throne, and the Queen herself was dressed only in her typical queenly attire (avec sturdy shoes and purse, of course). I know Charles will be there from now on since Philip has officially stepped down from public duties, but after so many years seeing the Duke of Edinburgh there, it reminds you of how much things are changing.

The crown was still present, regardless. It rested on a cushion near the queen.

Some people have posed the theory that the Queen was using her powers of subtlety to show her support for the European Union with her outfit. Strangely enough, her all-blue hat features flowers containing yellow centers, all somewhat arranged in a circle like the yellow stars on the blue flag of the EU. Interesting…

It’s summer! Let the royal work commence.

Summer break is here! Am I road-tripping?

No.

Well, I’ll be traveling a little, but mostly I will be back at work writing, drawing, and offering commentary all throughout the summer months. Am I excited? You’d better believe it. I love my job as a teacher assistant, but the royal world excites me like nothing else, career-wise. Now, the time has come to get back into all of that. Keep an eye out for some great things. Onward!

– Mandy

Countess Mountbatten stamp cover, a treasure

I wanted to share a bit of history since the passing of Patricia, Countess Mountbatten – a stamp cover she signed for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II.


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I acquired this stamp cover during the Golden Jubilee celebrations. It would be wonderful to say that she signed it for me personally; alas, it was one of several – yet limited – signed copies. It was a lovely piece to add to my collection because Countess Mountbatten was a great character. Not to mention that her father, Lord Mountbatten, was an incredibly interesting character himself. Mountbatten was known to be a bit vain, and though he was unstuffy, he did love his titles. So much, in fact, that he got special dispensation from the Queen to pass his title to Patricia, his eldest daughter. In this way, Mountbatten was quite progressive; the Queen herself did not amend the male-only succession to the throne until 2011.

Do you have a favorite item of royal memorabilia? Share your thoughts in the comments below. 

Patricia, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, dies at 93. 

Patricia, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, has died at the age of 93. She was the eldest daughter of Lord Louis “Dickie” Mountbatten, maternal uncle of Prince Philip.

The Countess is survived by her children and her sister, Lady Pamela Hicks. Her husband John, 7th Lord Brabourne, passed away in 2005 aged 80.

The Countess is lucky to have lived to 93 – she survived an IRA terrorist’s bomb in 1979 that killed her father, her mother-in-law, one of her twin sons, and a young boat boy while they were on holiday. In an interview decades later, Patricia noted that she still had flecks of green paint in her eyes from the explosion that tore apart the little green fishing boat.

Patricia was the eldest of two girls for Lord Louis Mountbatten and his wife, Edwina. Mountbatten wanted his title to continue despite having no male heirs, so by special dispensation granted by the Queen, Patricia became Countess Mountbatten upon her father’s death.

It was a time of severe grief, but Countess Mountbatten channeled her sadness into something that could help others. Over the decades since the incident, she used her own personal experience of loss – especially that of her son Nicholas – to help other bereaved parents. The Countess served as honorary president of Child Bereavement UK and Compassionate Friends.

My condolences to her family on this sad occasion, but with joy know she is reunited with her father and her son.

Norton, the eldest son of the Countess and Lord Brabourne, is now the 3rd Earl Mountbatten of Burma. His wife, Penny, is now known as Countess Mountbatten.

Hung Parliament

The general election in the UK has ended in a hung Parliament. This means that none of the political parties have the 326 seats needed to gain majority in the House of Commons. Theresa May’s Conservative Party led the pack, but still came up short for an overall win. Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party came second.

We might end up seeing a coalition government like the one formed with David Cameron and Nick Clegg. Chances are that will be the case, though if Theresa May can’t gather a majority from the other parties in negotiating a coalition or other deals, she may have to resign.

Mrs. May’s next move will be a visit to the Queen to ask permission to form a government.

Happy Coronation Day!

Thistle Queen


Sixty-four years ago today, London’s Westminster Abbey hosted a glittering assortment of royals from across the world for the coronation of Elizabeth II. Hope was high and Britain celebrated their new queen and her young family.

Sixty-four years on, the regal Elizabeth is respected and admired worldwide. She has become Britain’s longest-living and longest-reigning monarch. She’s been a steady influence and a source of traditon throughout massive change, and for that the Queen is an icon.

Today I wish her the best and thank her for her service. The phrase “long live the Queen” reached God’s ears, and He obliged!

Prince Charles Donates to Manchester Victims

Prince Charles has donated several thousand pounds to the victims of the Manchester terror attack. Prince Charles Donates to Manchester Victims

On May 22nd, a suicide bomber struck a multitude of victims during an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena. The Prince and his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall, expressed their horror at the event as did the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh.

According to The Herald (Scotland), Clarence House has said that the Prince had given an “undisclosed amount” to the We Love Manchester Emergency Fund. This is another reason I like Charles; he genuinely cares about people and tries to lift them up. His work for his Prince’s Trust charity is the perfect example of Charles’s nature to build up young people who need help, especially during a traumatic event such as Manchester.

Slideshow:

When Trump Meets Royalty

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President Donald Trump has paid a visit to the king and queen of the Belgians. 

Trump, along with his wife Melania, had a successful meeting with King Philippe and Queen Mathilde, but not everyone was thrilled.
Anything to do with Trump sets Twitter on fire like a match on an open can of gasoline. I simply retweeted the Palace’s own message about the visit, and the arguing started. People began tweetimg back and forth, inadvertently including @mandysroyalty in the crossfire. 

Nothing was flung at me personally, but the conversations I happened to see via the share was a cocktail of insults. So when Trump meets Queen Elizabeth II at some point, I can sadly expect much the same social media meltdown. Perhaps even worse.

 Is it worth it to post?
Yes. Thankfully we are free to discuss and post news as well as our opinions and if I want to write about Trump meeting Lilibet when it happens, I’m going to. Two heads of state meeting for the first time is important and you will be able to see it here (and be honest: who’s going to want to miss out on a chance to get an exquisitely Prince Philip-esque remark about the whole thing?)

So when the time comes, be warned: there will be no vitriol. Debate all you want, but keep it out of the gutter and above the belt. That goes for all future Trump visits to royals.

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